It Can Be Easy Going Green

April 25, 2014 10:45 pm News

25 April 2014

Coast Radio News

Local News

Going Green With Education

Tomorrow’s Green Fair at the Florence Events Center is aimed at education.  Visitors will learn how they can save energy by changing the way they do things; how they can save money by reducing waste; and, learn how an innovative program uses things like empty soda bottles; rubber bands and old CDs to teach kids about science.

Dave Twombly – “Laura Smith is going to be there, and she’s going to show all the stuff that she’s doing at the elementary school, as far as reusing products to make really educational items.”

Dave Twombly owns Central Coast Disposal, one of the exhibitors at tomorrow’s Green Fair.  Instead of standing there all day handing out brochures, he opted to turn his booth space over to Smith, also known in local schools as “the Science Lady”.

Dave Twombly – “I’m excited to be part of saying that’s a wonderful application of educating and reusing and recycling.”

Twombly says Smith volunteers her time in classrooms… and nearly all of the materials she uses comes straight out of recycling and garbage cans.  The Green Fair is open from ten AM to four PM tomorrow as the Florence Events Center.

Changes To Firewood Permits

If you like to head out into the Siuslaw National Forest and cut your own firewood, you’ll get a little more flexibility beginning next week.

Instead of buying firewood permits that are good for one cord… users now will get four tags, each for a quarter-cord..

Changes to firewood permits for personal use will be implemented beginning May 1st, but they won’t mean any changes in the cost or ultimately how much you can gather.  They’re still ten dollars per cord with a two-cord minimum and a maximum of six cords.  It’s just the tags that are different says Brenda Barton with the Siuslaw National Forest.

Permits are still sold only over the counter at District Offices in Waldport and Reedsport.

Dunes City Considers Dispensary Moratorium

A special meeting of the Dunes City Council is set for Tuesday afternoon with one item on the agenda… consideration and possible approval of a moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries.

The special meeting is required because there is a legislatively mandated deadline of May 1st for any and all such moratoriums.  Failure to act by that date means medical pot stores would be allowed.  Approval of the moratorium would only block them temporarily, giving time for local officials to review and consider any changes to regulations on just where one would be allowed.

Florence was an early enactor of a moratorium, they blocked them in February.

Following the one o’clock special meeting at Dunes City Hall, the budget committee will convene.

Oberon “Flips” for Florence

Sunday’s presentation of “Midsummer Night’s Dream” on the Florence Events Center Stage is presented with Shakespeare newcomers in mind.  But the Lane Community College production, under the guidance of Director Judith Roberts, has the potential to captivate even the most experienced Shakespeare veteran.  One reason, says theater critic Dorothy Velasco, Roberts has injected plenty of action into the classic comedy.

The mate of Fairy King Oberon, Titania, played by Michelle Nordella, falls in love with Nick Bottom, a craftsman, played by Robert Newcomer, in the comic romp Midsummer Night's Dream presented by the LCC Theater Department in Florence April 27th.  (Photo courtesy of LCC).

The mate of Fairy King Oberon, Titania, played by Michelle Nordella, falls in love with Nick Bottom, a craftsman, played by Robert Newcomer, in the comic romp Midsummer Night’s Dream presented by the LCC Theater Department in Florence April 27th. (Photo courtesy of LCC).

Dorothy Velasco – “What she does with the fairies is wonderful because her Oberon, the king of the fairies, is actually a circus performer.  He comes in doing flips and cartwheels and leaping all over the place.”

Oberon’s servant, the mischievous Puck, is also quite acrobatic, climbing on her master’s shoulders, swinging from a rope and always moving.  The craftsmen preparing to put on their own play within the play are entertaining; and the young Athenians, Hermia and Lysander are…

Dorothy Velasco – “They’re played in a very recognizable way like high school students would be.  I think it’s very accessible, just made as real as possible, even with those fairies just flipping around in the air.”

Tickets for the one-time only show are $15 for adults, $8 for students and seniors.  They’re available in advance at the FEC Box Office or online.  The curtain rises Sunday afternoon at 2:30.

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